THE EXHIBITION "DON'T YOU THINK IT'S TIME TO LOVE"
3. A LOVER'S DISCOURSE: FRAGMENTS
Anita Sieff
Born in 1955 in Brennero (Italy).
Lives in Venice (Italy).
WORK:
"Missed II", 1995
Film, 16 mm, 10 min.
Courtesy of the artist
"They meet sometimes ignoring one another like being lost in their fragility and everlastingly they let themselves go in a continous flow and then the anxiety of our generation and then only our loves." With these poetic lines Anita Sieff concludes her film "Missed II", in the manner of an epitaph. Throughout the course of the film we see three young people wandering the labyrinth of Venetian streets, meeting and diverging. They are moved by desire, the search for the Other whom they are not fated to find. Something similar we can see in the films of Michelangelo Antonioni, this search of the self and an Other by random movements through an urban setting. And in fact years of collaboration and friendship connect him and Sieff. In other aspects there is nothing of Antonioni's "poetry of alienation" in "Missed II". It is Antonioni's characters that take to the city streets in depression and despair, whereas the characters of "Missed II" do not seem to worry so much over their "anxiety and love", as much as they are presenting themselves in the company of the city. And one can hardly think of a better place for a scene than Venice, which looks like theatrical scenery on its own, and even its every corner and courtyard seems like a set. By choosing a black and white film Sieff creates an expressly nostalgic tone and aesthetic: the camera follows the wanderings of the characters and the images trickle and vibrate like the reflection in the canals of Venice. So if "Missed II" is akin to a mirage or a dream, why should one be surprised – cinema is "the dream factory". If one admits that Anita Sieff's film is about love, one should clarify that it simultaneously is a film about the love of cinema. And are not the best films love films?
THE HUMAN CONDITION
artistic director of the project: Viktor Misiano
National Center for Contemporary Arts
Moscow Museum of Modern Art
Jewish Museum and Tolerance Center
Made on
Tilda